Matheny ejected for first time as manager

Matheny ejected for first time as manager

CHICAGO -- Cardinals manager Mike Matheny was thrown out of a 3-2 loss to the Cubs on Tuesday at Wrigley Field for arguing a call at second base. It was the rookie skipper's first ejection.

Tony Campana began the Cubs' rally in the 10th inning with a one-out single up the middle, and he stole second with Starlin Castro batting. Catcher Yadier Molina's throw appeared to nab Campana, but second-base umpire Bill Welke signaled him safe. Cardinals second baseman Tyler Greene immediately began arguing with Welke as Matheny made his way out on the field. The manager argued for a brief period before he was tossed.

"I thought he was out, and I knew they missed the earlier call," Matheny said. "To sit there and watch our guys get short-ended on great plays and not have something to say about it would be tragic."

The play proved consequential two batters later, when Alfonso Soriano's single ricocheted off Greene, allowing Campana to score from second as the winning run.

"He was out 100 percent," Greene said. "For one, I tagged him. For two, he never touched the bag. I mean, he missed it. Plain and simple."

It was the game's second controversial call. The first run of the game was scored on a similar play at the plate in the first inning.

With Cubs right fielder David DeJesus -- who led off the game with a double -- on third, Castro lifted a fly ball to right field. St. Louis' Carlos Beltran settled under it and fired to Molina. Molina caught the ball and went toward home to tag DeJesus, who slid to the right of the plate and reached for it as home-plate umpire Chris Conroy called him safe. TV replays appeared to show DeJesus didn't touch home plate.

Molina disagreed with the call and Matheny also came out to argue with Conroy.

"It's a shame is all," Matheny said. "First run was a shame and the last run was a shame. Those are my thoughts."

Cash Kruth is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @cashkruth. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.